Polyglot programming

Have you ever been in a situation when you’ve got not enough tooling in your preferred environment? What did you do back then? Did you use already known tools or search for something better?
Recently I’ve been involved in a project which truly pushed me out of my comfort zone. I like .NET, but there’s not enough tooling to provide a highly scalable, performant, failure resistant environment. We moved to Java, Storm, Cassandra, Zookeeper – JVM all over the place. It wasn’t easy, but it was interesting and eye opening. Having so many libraries focused on resolving specified concerns instead of the .NET framework-oriented paradigm was very refreshing.
Was it worth it? Yes. Was it good for self-development? Yes. Will I reach for every new library/language? For sure no. The most important thing which I’ve learned so far, was that being adaptable and aware of tools is the most important thing. Mistakes were made, that for sure, but the overall solution is growing in a right direction.
After all, it’s survival of the fittest, isn’t it?

Disruptor with MultiProducer

I hope you’re aware of the LMAX tool for fast in memory processing called disruptor. If not, it’s a must-see for nowadays architects. It’s nice to see your process eating messages with speeds ~10 millions/s.
One of the problems addressed in the latest release was a fast multi producer allowing one to instantiate multiple tasks publishing data for their consumers. I must admit that the simplicity of this robust part is astonishing. How one could handle claiming and publishing a one or a few items from the buffer ring? Its easy, claim it in a standard way using CAS operation to let other threads know about the claimed value and publish it. But how publish this kind of info? Here’s come the beauty of this solution:

  1. allocate a int array of the buffer ring length
  2. when items are published calculate their positions in the ring (sequence % ring.length)
  3. set the values in the helper int array with numbers of sequences (or values got from them)

This, with overhead of int array allows:

  1. waiting for producer by simply checking the value in the int array, if it matches the current number of buffer iteration
  2. publishing in the same order items were claimed
  3. publishing with no additionals CASes

Simple, powerful and fast.
Come, take a look at it: MultiProducerSequencer

Out of order commands

In the previous posts a simple mechanism of storing information needed for operation idempotence was introduced. A simple hash table, which state is transactionally saved with the state of object onto which the send operation was applied. How about receiving operations out of order? What if infrastructure (for instance, messaging system) will pass one operation earlier than the second, which in reality occurred earlier?

It’s time to make it explicit and start calling elements in the DDD manner. So for sake of reference, the object considered as the subject of an operation is an aggregate root. The operation is of course a message. The modeling assumes using the event sourcing as a storage for aggregates’ states.

Assume, that the aggregate, which the command is sent to, has a property called Version, incremented with each event applied on. Assume then, each command contains a version number, which is supposed to be equal to the aggregate’s version. If, during dispatch, these two values are different, an exception is thrown and command do not change the state of the aggregate. It’s a simple optimistic concurrency implementation, allowing discarding out of order commands sent to an object.

To make it more interesting, consider a sharded system, where specific aggregates are stored by different nodes (but for each aggregate there is one node where it is stored). An aggregate’s events (state changes) have to be propagated across all the nodes/shards in the same idempotent manner as commands are sent to aggregates. It’s easy to apply hashtable for each node and with using the very same key: aggregateId with version but it would mean storing all the pairs of aggregate identifiers with their versions, which could possibly bring down each of your nodes (or make you use GBs of memory). Can the trivial fact, that version is increased with every event on the aggregate, could be used for some optimization? You’ll see in the next entry.