Pearls: EventStore transaction log

I thought for a while about presenting a few projects which are in my opinion real pearls. Let’s start with the EventStore and one in one of its aspects: the transaction log.
If you’re not familiar with this project, EventStore is a stream database providing complex event processing. It’s oriented around streams of events, which can be easily aggregated or repartitioned with projections. Based on ever appended streams and projections chasing the streams one can build a truly powerful logic around processing events.
One of the interesting aspects of EventStore is its storage engine. You can find a bit of description in here. ES does not abstract a storage away, the storage is a built-in part of the database itself. Let’s take a look at its parts before discussing its further:

Appending to the log
One the building blocks of ES is SEDA architecture – the communication within db is based on publishing and consuming messages, which one can notice reviewing StorageWriterService. The service subscribes to multiple messages, mentioned in implementations of the IHandle interface. The arising question is how often does the service flushed it’s messages to disk. One can notice, that method EnqueueMessage beside enqueuing incoming messages counts ones marked by interface IFlushableMessage. What is it for?
Each Handle method call Flush at its very end. Additionally, as the EnqueueMessage increases the counter of messages requiring flush, each Handle method decreases the counter when it handles a flushable message. This brings us to the conclusion that the mentioned counter is equal 0 iff there are no more flushable messages in the queue.

Flushing the log
Once the Flush is called a condition is checked whether:

  • the call was made with force=true (this never happens) or
  • there are no more flush messages in the queue or
  • the given time from the last time has passed

This provides a very powerful batching behavior. Under stress, the flush-to-be counter will be constantly greater than 0, providing flushing every given period of time. Under less stress, with no more flushables in the queue, ES will flush every message which needs to flush the log file.

Acking the client
The final part of the processing is the acknowledgement part. The client should be informed about persisting a transaction to disk. I spent a bit of time (with help of Greg Young and James Nugent) of chasing the place where the ack is generated. It does not happen in the StorageWriterService. What’s responsible for considering the message written then? Here comes the second part of the solution, the StorageChaser. In a dedicated thread, in an infinite loop, a method ChaserIteration is called. The method tries to read a next record from a chunk of unmanaged memory, that was ensured to be flushed by the StorageWriterService. Once the chaser finds CommitRecord, written when a transaction is commited, it acks the client by publishing the StorageMessage.CommitAck in ProcessCommitRecord method. The message will be translated to a client message, confirming the commit and sent back to the client.

Sum up
One cannot deny the beauty and simplicity of this solution. One component tries to flush as fast as possible, or batches a few messages if it cannot endure the pressure. Another one waits for the position to which a file is flushed to be increased. Once it changes, it reads the record (from the in-memory chunk matched with the file on disk) processes it and sends acks. Simple and powerful.

Reconcilation between systems

From time to time a system is replaced with another system being capable of doing more, or doing the thing better. It’s quite to common to ask whether no data is lost or does the system preserve needed behaviors of the old one. Sometimes it’s human-application comparison, when a procedure followed by people is replaced with an application, sometimes it’s a question of an old system vs a new system

Cassandra integrity check
Let’s presume one migrates some old-fashioned SQL system to a Cassandra based solution given following:

  1. total payload of daily data is quite high
  2. data are written to the Cassandra cluster (more than one node) with ConsistencyLevel Local Quorum
  3. there should be a possibility to check whether all the data stored in the previous systems are written to the new one

After a bit of consideration one can propose that as the data are written with LocalQuorum, they should be queried with the same level and match in the old solution. This would ensure that data which has been written are being read (famous R + W > N). This could cost a lot as querying hits [N+1]/2 nodes of your cluster, streaming a daily payload through network twice: once to the coordinator, second – to the client. Can we do this better?

Possibly faster integrity check
How about using Consistency Level of One? How can this be done to ensure that the given node consists of all the needed data? By running repair in your local data center on each node, one can ensure that each node consist of all the data it’s responsible for. Then, querying with One is ok. What’s important about nodetool repair is that it does not stream data if it’s not needed. The information sent to match if the given node contains all the data is a Merkle tree, a tree made by hash of hashes of hashes of… Sending this structure is cheap and doesn’t your network so much.
If you consider (know that) running repairs daily is a heavy task for your cluster, you’ll be happy to read about Cassandra 2.1 repair improvements, including incremental repairs.

So stop complaining about your good old fashioned RMDB and get yourself a new shiny cluster of Cassandra nodes :)

Polyglot programming

Have you ever been in a situation when you’ve got not enough tooling in your preferred environment? What did you do back then? Did you use already known tools or search for something better?
Recently I’ve been involved in a project which truly pushed me out of my comfort zone. I like .NET, but there’s not enough tooling to provide a highly scalable, performant, failure resistant environment. We moved to Java, Storm, Cassandra, Zookeeper – JVM all over the place. It wasn’t easy, but it was interesting and eye opening. Having so many libraries focused on resolving specified concerns instead of the .NET framework-oriented paradigm was very refreshing.
Was it worth it? Yes. Was it good for self-development? Yes. Will I reach for every new library/language? For sure no. The most important thing which I’ve learned so far, was that being adaptable and aware of tools is the most important thing. Mistakes were made, that for sure, but the overall solution is growing in a right direction.
After all, it’s survival of the fittest, isn’t it?